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Hindustan Times is insensitive December 23, 2012

Posted by simarprit in Cities, Delhi, India, Is anyone listening, News, News Reaction.
1 comment so far

Hindustan Times by-line reads: “Cops use water cannons, teargas to stop mob from marching to President’s house.”

Hello? Mob? Are you sure?

Looks like, they need to learn their lessons in sensitivity, English and journalism, in that order.  Yes, mob does mean crowd, but its usage here is incorrect, inappropriate and unacceptable.

Let me explain one by one.

Sensitivity: Next they would call Bhagat Singh a terrorist, 1857 a mutiny and Subhash Chandra Bose one of Hitler’s cronies.

English: This is what Dictionary.com has to say for defining “mob”

1. a disorderly or riotous crowd of people.
2. a crowd bent on or engaged in lawless violence.
3. any group or collection of persons or things.
4. the common people; the masses; populace or multitude.
5. a criminal gang, especially one involved in drug trafficking, extortion, etc.

They could have simply called it a crowd, if that was the intended meaning, why brand it as a mob? It hurts. Those who were protesting there were protesting for a cause, not a cause which would make them richer or was aimed at their sexual gratification, come on. Usage of this word is a heinous crime in itself.

Journalism: As per Wikipedia “Journalism is the activity or product of journalists or others engaged in the preparation of written, visual or audio material intended for dissemination as news, topical information and other contemporary fact, analysis and opinion. Journalism is directed at the consumers of media products, who may comprise nonspecific general audiences, or narrower market segments).

Not even a word of this by-line adheres to any of the operatives behind the word journalism. Who is this by-line aimed at? It looks like this by-line is aimed at scoring brownies with the Central Government. Hindustan Times doesn’t know what “by-line” stands for.

Gentleman and dignified ladies  behind Hindustan Times, by-line is an executive summary and editorial message rolled into one, right? We get the message Hindustan Times, your newspaper stands for insensitive, pseudo-journalism written in bad English aimed at protecting your business interests and pleasing your political bosses.

The Malls of Gurgaon – Shopping Destination of Asia July 5, 2008

Posted by simarprit in Cities, Delhi, Gurgaon, India, Shopping.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
3 comments

Every time I come tMallo Gurgaon from New Delhi I find myself asking the same question, would there be so many customers. Someone told me that on last count Gurgaon has over 125 Air-conditioned  Shopping Complexes under construction, popularly called Malls of Gurgaon, apart from over 30 which are already functioning. Quite a few for a city which had a population of just over 200,000 in 2001. The city has grown very rapidly, it is likely that the population as of now could be close to even a Million, even for a city of a Million 150 Air-conditioned Shopping Malls look too many. The spill over of Delhi is something everyone talks about, but Delhi in itself is getting a new mall at the rate of one every week, if not more. Where would the spill come from, even the catchment area of the spillover is reducing. East of Delhi would go to Ghaziabad, Fardiabad, Noida and Greater Noida; South would go to Noida, Greater Noida and Faridabad; South West would still go to Gurgaon but lot of South West would go to Dwarka; North would spill over to Wazirabad, Sonipat and Rohtak seriously damaging the catchment area left for Gurgaon, moreover Gurgaon would loose its own people to Manesar and New Gurgaon so how can the Malls of Gurgaon survive? This is literally a Billion $ question as put together the investment in Malls of Gurgaon would be in Billions of Dollars. 

In my assessment Gurgaon would become a Shopping Destination City not only only for NCR of Delhi or North India or India, but maybe for whole of Asia. There would be challenges, but then no destination is made without surmounting insurmountable challenges.

More to come…